Cushings and Addisons Part 2

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Category: Nurses Club
Published on: 25.08.2022

Presenter:

Kelly Druce
PGCert Vet
ED BSC (HONS) DTILLS FHEA RVN

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About The Webinar

Hypoadrenocorticism (hAC) is considered a rare endocrinopathy in dogs yet with over 12million pet dogs in the UK alone, it is now well recognised and presents familiarly to practitioners. Underpinning knowledge of the disease and its presenting signs is essential if it is to be considered as a differential diagnosis and appropriate testing undertaken.
Commonly referred to as Addison’s, the disease most often results from primary destruction of the adrenal glands and subsequent glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency. The disease can also present as a secondary disease or in an atypical form where only glucocorticoid deficiency is present.
The key to accurately diagnosing Addisons is to be suspicious of the disease and nurses play a vital role in patient assessment, and monitoring of the patient’s response to their surroundings. Classically affected dogs are lethargic, weak and demonstrate an inappropriate response to stress, particularly in the hospital environment.
Diagnosis of the disease (once considered) is often straight forward, and treatments available offer a good prognosis if long term treatment is continued and monitored as needed.
This webinar aims to increase awareness of the condition and enable those working in practice to consider Addison’s as a differential, ideally leading to more accurate diagnosis, treatment, and management.

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